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Debug.Assert() isn't thrown


Debug.Assert() isn't thrown

By : Holmespoint
Date : November 21 2020, 03:00 PM
Any of those help Project Properties ➤ Compile ➤ Advanced Compile Options
You will see a checkbox for Define DEBUG constant. This must be checked for Debug functions to work. If it's not, they will be ignored and not compiled into your assembly.
code :


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Debug.Assert vs. Specific Thrown Exceptions

Debug.Assert vs. Specific Thrown Exceptions


By : Josh
Date : March 29 2020, 07:55 AM
like below fixes the issue Assertions are not for parameter checking. Parameter checking should always be done (and precisely according to what pre-conditions are specified in your documentation and/or specification), and the ArgumentOutOfRangeException thrown as necessary.
Assertions are for testing for "impossible" situations, i.e., things that you (in your program logic) assume are true. The assertions are there to tell you if these assumptions are broken for any reason.
Should Debug.Assert and Debug.Fail be used liberally, and should they be left in production code?

Should Debug.Assert and Debug.Fail be used liberally, and should they be left in production code?


By : user3166159
Date : March 29 2020, 07:55 AM
wish helps you It is fine, since the compiler omits it in release build. It is not bad practice, and you do not need to remove them from source (indeed, you probably shouldn't). But you must be careful:
code :
Debug.Assert(SomethingImportantThatMustExecute());
bool result = SomethingImportantThatMustExecute()
Debug.Assert(result);
How to get the thrown exception using Assert.That, à la Assert.Throws<T>

How to get the thrown exception using Assert.That, à la Assert.Throws<T>


By : NATO
Date : March 29 2020, 07:55 AM
will be helpful for those in need Unfortunately, I don't think you can use Assert.That to return the exception like Assert.Throws. You could, however, still program in a more fluent style than your first example using either of the following:
Option 1 (most fluent/readable)
code :
Assert.That(() => MyMethod(), Throws.Exception.TypeOf<MyCustomException>()
    .With.Property("Property1").EqualTo("Some thing")
    .With.Property("Property2").EqualTo("Some thing else"));
Assert.Throws(Is.Typeof<MyCustomException>()
    .And.Property( "Property1" ).EqualTo( "Some thing")
    .And.Property( "Property2" ).EqualTo( "Some thing else"),
    () => MyMethod());
Is there any way to make Resharper treat Trace.Assert like Debug.Assert?

Is there any way to make Resharper treat Trace.Assert like Debug.Assert?


By : batman8000
Date : March 29 2020, 07:55 AM
Any of those help It understands that if the assertion is false that Debug.Assert will throw rather than continue and thus it knows the assertion is true past that point. , I just tested this in ReSharper 9.1.3 with the following sample code.
code :
private void M(string a)
{
    Trace.Assert(a != null); // or Debug.Assert(a != null);

    if (a == null)
        Console.WriteLine("a is null");
}
Jest: test that exception will be thrown isnt working

Jest: test that exception will be thrown isnt working


By : nida shaikh
Date : March 29 2020, 07:55 AM
Any of those help Jest docs say:
code :
        expect(sc.getTemplateName).toThrow('foo');
        expect(sc.getTemplateName).toThrow(Error);
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